Nine Famous Nutrition Findings That May Be Myths

Nine Famous Nutrition Findings That May Be Myths

I really like science and research.  Without it, my industry would not be where it is today.  However, the science field is not perfect and has it’s flaws.

It was recently reported that a famed Cornell researcher Brian Wansink and his Food and Brand Lab published hundreds of studies that have not been able to stand up to scientific scrutiny.  In other words, the data was flawed.  Based on this discovery, two decades worth of study findings on the psychology and marketing of food and eating may be invalid.

Because his work was so famous, I felt it was important to share this information with you. There’s a very good chance one or many of his findings have ben passed on to you by a trustworthy source.

Here are nine of the  famous – and now suspect- findings:

  • Keeping junk foods out of sight causes us to eat less of them.
  • Using smaller plates leads people to eat less.
  • People will eat almost all of the food that they serve themselves.
  • The nutritional gatekeeper at home influences nearly 75% of the food eaten by the rest of the family.
  • Half of the snack foods bought in bulk are eaten within a week of purchase.
  • Men eat more in the company of women.
  • Trayless cafeterias lead diners to choose less salad and more dessert.
  • Hungry grocery shoppers buy more calories, not more food.
  • Nutrition report cards may improve school lunch selection.

While some of the findings above may prove to be true for some or even many people, the scientific data that was used is now considered unreliable.  For the most up-to-date list of questioned studies you can check out the Retraction Database at retractiondatabase.org.

I believe it’s a good idea to pay attention to current research when it comes to health and fitness. I also believe it’s important to discover what works for you personally.  In the end it’s all about being healthy and whole.  Just because something is “science” based doesn’t mean it’s right for you or you need to jump on board.

I encourage you to be open to new research. I also recommend that you seek wise counsel, listen to good doctors, listen to your body, and pay close attention to your gut instincts.  🙂

Here’s to a happy and healthy week!

Shared with love,

Jennifer

 

Five Reasons To Eat Slowly And Enjoy Your Food

Five Reasons To Eat Slowly And Enjoy Your Food

I’ll be the first to admit that I can eat way too fast at times and I have to remind myself to slow down and enjoy my meal.  When you are busy and eating to fuel your body, meal time can turn into a chore or a forgotten moment in time.  In today’s fast paced lifestyle where sit down meals are becoming more rare, inhaling our food can be easy.  However, current research suggests that eating at a slower pace can give the body a better chance to feel satisfied and enjoy the food which leads to less mindless overeating.

Slow eating can also help control blood sugar and have a positive impact on one’s overall health. If you are like me , and have to remind yourself to eat a little slower from time to time,  here are five reasons to give you some incentive.

1. Your body needs time to tell you that you’re full.

It takes approximately 20 minutes for your body to signal that you’re full, so people who eat at a faster pace can overeat before they even know it’s happening.  When you eat slower you give your body a chance to let you know that you’ve eaten the right amount of food.   This works as a great motivator for most people because none of us like feeling “stuffed”.  It’s uncomfortable!

2. Eating fast can cause indigestion.

When we start to eat, our body goes through a multi-step digestive process.  If you eat too quickly, your body isn’t ready for the incoming food which can lead to indigestion.  Ugh!

3. Slow eaters are less likely to develop metabolic syndrome.

People who eat fast are more likely to have the conditions, known as metabolic syndrome, that can lead to future cardiovascular disease. Those conditions include increased blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal cholesterol.  While eating slower alone doesn’t make you bullet proof, it can certainly help contribute to better health.

4. Eating slower can positively affect your weight.

By slowing down when we eat, we become more aware of when we’re full, and are more likely to stop eating when our bodies have had enough.  This helps limit overeating and consuming more energy than your body may need.

5. take a break to enjoy your food.

Eating should be an opportunity for all of us to take a moment and enjoy the food in front of us and the company around us.  I always eat great food, but sometimes I eat it so fast that I don’t really appreciate all of the great flavors and textures.  If we treated most of our meal times like fine dining experiences, I believe we would be more likely to savor every bite even when you’re eating something as simple as a bowl of soup or a sandwich.

Slowing down to eat a meal helps us to become more present and to take a break from the busyness of the day which can lower stress and improve your overall sense of well being.  There is a reason why sitting down for a long meal is one of the top ways that we relax and connect with one another.

Please remember that everyone eats too fast and even overeats from time to time.  Don’t ever beat yourself up or feel guilty about anything food related, ever.   Guilt can stress you out which is NEVER  helpful.  Taking care of your health is a long term effort and it’s all about balance.  None of us are perfect.  🙂

Here’s to a happy, healthy, and mindful week!

Shared with love,

Jennifer

 

 

Simple Ways To Cut Back On Sugar

Simple Ways To Cut Back On Sugar

Photo by Brian Chan on Unsplash

When it comes to nutrition, I do not believe in being overly restrictive in any area of your diet unless you are being advised to do so by a medical professional for good solid reasons.  If you enjoy sweets than I believe you should allow yourself to eat them.

It’s important to note that some sugar is actually good for you.  Naturally occurring sugars found in whole foods are an important part of a diverse diet.  We need carbs to function properly.  However, too much added sugar in your diet can throw your body out of whack and  has been linked to some serious health issues.  Added sugars are sugars and syrups that are added to foods or beverages when they are processed or prepared.

Added sugar can show up in foods you might not expect, like salad dressings and bread.  Simple steps like making your own salad dressings and sauces at home can hep you cut back on sugar without sacrificing taste.  While I’m probably not going to start baking bread every week, making my own salad dressing is definitely doable and I can buy bread with no added sugar.

I recommend reading the labels before buying prepared foods.  You don’t need to obsess, just simply become aware of how much sugar you are eating on a daily basis.  If everything you are eating has “added” sugar, consider alternative brands with less sugar or even making some of the food from scratch and skipping the sugar altogether.  Often times, it’s being used for a preservative so removing it from the ingredients list is not that big of a deal.

Here’s a simple salad dressing recipe to help you get started:

This recipe makes two servings so you may want to double or triple the recipe. 🙂

3 Tbsp olive oil

1 Tbsp Apple Cider or White Wine Vinegar

1/4 Tsp salt

1/4 Tsp black pepper or salt free seasoning like Trader Joe’s 21 Seasoning Salute.  It’s okay to get creative.

Place all ingredients in a salad dressing shaker.  You can usually find them in your kitchen section at your local hardware store or search for one on line.  Shake and serve over your favorite salad.

Cutting back on excess sugar isn’t about deprivation.  It’s about creating balance in your daily diet, feeling good, and taking good care of your health.

Here’s to a happy and healthy week!

Shared with love,

Jennifer